Printed Electronics adds security to your Banknotes

Sipca, a company founded in 1927, provides secured identification, traceability and authentication solutions and services.  A core component of their security expertise is the use of security inks that protect the majority of the worlds banknotes.  I was interested to notice that earlier this year they filed a patent application combining the use of security inks with flexible printed electronics features to further enhance the security aspects of banknotes.

Banknote

The patent application is WO2016037895, published on 17 March 2016, the inventors being Brahim Kerkar and Philippe Amon.

Most recent(amended) claim 1 is:

A banknote comprising: one or more security features, at least two flexible printed electronic (FPE) elements embedded in the banknote, at least one of the one or more security features and at least one of the at least two FPE elements have an interrelationship with each other, and a plurality of the at least two FPE elements have an interrelationship with each other, characterized in that each FPE element contains one or more security features comprising a chemical key represented with a set of molecules having different absorption or emission spectra, preferably said banknote comprising “n” FPE elements and “m” luminescent compounds, providing n*m potential combinations of secure FPEs dispatched in each banknote.

A typical banknote is shown in Fig 2 above (taken from the patent application) and has a variety of features for added security such as a substrate (0), a flag (10) and security features being a serial number (1 ), value numbers (2; 3) (wherein one of said value number is made of a colorshifting ink), an intaglio printed design (4), patterns made of a luminescent ink (5), luminescent fibers (6) incorporated in the substrate (0); a security thread (7), a transparent window (8) and a hologram (9).

The invention describes a banknote which has at least 2 FPE elements and these are designed to relate to each other and to the other security elements to provide the authentication mechanism.  Various modes of operation are described including the ability for the FPE to be capable of additional features such as being configured to interact, for example, with a computer and/or a mobile phone.

One example provided is if a banknote having added FPE features is stolen, the owner, for example, using a mobile phone already containing the data related to the banknote (e.g., in a storage device) can send a communication to (e.g., all banks around the world), identifying the banknote as stolen, to be sure that the banknote is identified as stolen and/or is no longer valid. In other embodiments, the FPE may be operable to send a signal to the owner’s mobile device when a banknote belonging to the owner is used. Thus, if the banknote is stolen, when the thief attempts to use the stolen banknote, the owner is notified, and can contact the police. The embedded FPE may also provide traceability capabilities for the banknote, so that, for example, a location of the stolen banknote can be determined.

Phil’s Comments:

This is a further example of the way flexible printed electronics can enhance the practical usefulness of everyday things.  The examples here also include security aspects which in itself is a huge technology field for the detection of counterfeiting and theft.  The secret is the ability to make these FPE elements small enough and self contained to work over a long period without the need for a separate power source.  Passive RFID elements are now very common and in everyday use.